Hinge In-App Guide


Unlike their straight or cis counterparts, LGBTQIA+ folks have fewer resources to turn to when it comes to navigating their identity and dating—putting queer daters at a disadvantage in building healthy and meaningful connections. In fact, 80% of LGBTQIA+ users on Hinge struggle to find resources that help them date. A twist on a traditional Q&A, Hinge’s NFAQ platform is a collection of questions queer singles need answered the most—questions of sexuality, self-discovery, and connection—all through the lens of dating and relationships.

Starting on Tuesday, August 9, 2022, NFAQ will be available globally in Hinge’s app, so that users can tap into this resource at any point on their dating journey. Additionally, the platform will be available for anyone to access at hinge.nfaq.co. Daters can also submit their own questions at any time for future consideration as Hinge continues the conversation with the LGBTQIA+ community.

Hinge is tapping influential and credible perspectives from across the LGBTQIA+ community to share their lived experiences on important topics not talked about enough on social media or in mainstream media.

  • Vacancy Project founder and hair stylist Masami Hosono (they/them) is addressing the NFAQ topic: “I matched with my ex's ex, but we're still friends. How should I approach setting up a date?”
  • Licensed social worker and therapist Shahem McLaurin (they/them) is addressing the NFAQ topic: “I’m demisexual. What’s the best way to set expectations around waiting to get sexual?”
  • Former magazine editor Phillip Picardi (he/him) is addressing the NFAQ topic, “How do I talk about the importance of my faith with someone who might not be on the same page?”
  • Writer, actor, and filmmaker Tara Raani (they/she/he) is addressing the NFAQ topic: “How can I start dating if I'm not ready to come out?”
  • Emergency Medicine Physician Dr. Darien Sutton (he/him) is addressing the NFAQ topic: “How do I express my boundaries around substance use without sounding judgemental?”
  • Be Not Afraid of Love author and artist Mimi Zhu (they/them) is addressing the NFAQ topic: “How can I feel better affirmed in my gender in the early stages of dating?
hinge NFAQ article being displayed on a smartphone.

Hinge In-App NFAQ section

“For LGBTQIA+ people, our experiences are so unique that the typical answers to dating questions don't meet our needs. NFAQ is a transformative resource that will support queer daters with creating and maintaining authentic relationships,” says Hinge’s Love and Connection Expert Moe Ari Brown, LMFT. “NFAQ is making the necessary space to not only answer LGBTQIA+ folks’ burning questions but to also cultivate an atmosphere of celebration and inclusivity on Hinge and beyond our app.”

“Hinge is committed to helping everyone find love—yet the support daters need along the way isn’t always available. With the launch of NFAQ, we are able to promote meaningful conversations about the intricacies of LGBTQIA+ dating and empower queer daters with guidance from credible voices that will ultimately help them find someone special,” says Jackie Jantos, Hinge’s Chief Marketing Officer.

Ongoing Commitment

With the launch of NFAQ, Hinge is also investing resources in local LGBTQIA+ community centers across the United States as they work tirelessly to create supportive and affirming spaces. Included in the company’s efforts are supporting the Brooklyn Pride Center with tackling queer isolation, the Trans Wellness Center with providing comprehensive resources and services under one roof for transgender and non-binary people in Los Angeles, and the Detroit-based community center, Affirmations, with their focus on providing behavioral counseling and health.

Hinge continues to introduce new efforts supporting LGBTQIA+ daters on their journeys of self-expression and finding connections. In May, Hinge launched Mental Health Advocates of Tomorrow to increase therapy access for BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ daters. Earlier this year, with the support of GLAAD, Hinge released new Prompts to help LGBTQIA+ users better connect based on similarities, interests, and compatibility. Additionally, the app’s algorithm has a gender selection that includes “non-binary,” and profiles offer a range of representation choices singles can add to their profile to better express themselves. This includes pronouns, sexual orientation options, more than 50 gender options, and the ability to write in your gender.

About Hinge

Hinge is the dating app designed to be deleted. In today’s digital world, singles are so focused on sending likes and looking through profiles that they’re not actually building meaningful connections and finding relationships. Hinge is on a mission to change that by designing the most effective, 3D app experience. On Hinge, there are no rules, timers, or games. Instead, you’ll have unique conversations over the text, photos, and audio you’ve shared on your profile. And it’s resonating with daters. In 2021, Hinge saw a 36% increase in dates globally in comparison to 2020. Hinge was acquired by Match Group(NASDAQ:MTCH) in 2018

How to talk about transgender issues

So how do we talk about transgender issues (even if you're not transgender)? There are three main things to remember when discussing transgender issues today, so before getting into the meat and potatoes of it all, let's keep these things in mind:

  1. It is not a political discussion, it is a human rights discussion.
  2. There is a rich history rooted in transgender rights that must be considered when discussing these issues.
  3. Humanization should always be at the forefront of the conversation.

Before going into any conversation, no matter who it's with, try to keep these things in mind before you say something that may be inappropriate, misguided, or just plain wrong. Even those with the best intentions can mess up; remember that it is always ok to admit when you do not know something or when you are wrong. That being said, let's get into it.

sign with a 'friendly for all genders' image showing a person in a wheelchair, and a person with half a dress and pants on.

Transgender bathroom bills

commons.wikimedia.org

So whether you choose to become a transgender activist or if you just want to be a better ally, this easy talking point will generally keep you in line and on the safe side of conversations while still putting forth the effort to encourage and better represent transgender rights.

Easy, all-around approach: This will work for almost all transgender issues and expand on the previous three rules; firstly, trans issues are not a debate. When discussing with someone, do not indulge in hypotheticals and always remember that transgender people are the exact same as anyone else, with the exact same feelings. Keeping this in mind, let's use the bathroom bill as an example. When discussing this issue, one should humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation. How does one employ this, though? Here is an example of how the conversation may go.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restroom, they will rape my daughters.

So this statement is clearly based on reactionary conversation perpetuated by anti-transgender ideals. This means that the person probably has a misconception of the history and oppression of transgender people. They also show concern for their family, which is a step towards humanization, despite the misconception. Here would be an appropriate response that helps to humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation.

Person 2: I don't want men in the women's restroom, either, which is why we need to make sure people who identify as women are using the women's restroom. There has never been a documented case where a transgender person has raped either a man or woman in a public restroom. And by forcing people to use a restroom that does not match their gender identity, it is promoting violence, as there is a strong history of physical violence against transgender people.

By only saying about three sentences, you are able to do the previous steps while discussing the issue in a civil manner without opening it up to debate. The key to this is to keep it short and sweet, stating both the truth and an ally's stance to support the transgender community. It's critical to make sure that what you say is backed with confidence, though, which is why this second approach is more encouraged as it gives the person speaking more confidence in their opinion.

gif of a man in a suit talking about number 1. Number 1 GIF by PragerU Giphy

The second approach: backed by facts and history, is the exact same as before, but this approach leaves the other person with more questions about their stance and gives them something to consider. Before going into this approach, however, it is important to keep in mind that you are not debating the existence of trans people, nor are you trying to change someone's mind. That is not the goal; the goal is simply to get your opinion across in a way that honors both the trans community and their ideas. Let's take the same example as before but add the new sentiments.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restrooms, they will rape my daughters.

Person 2: There has never been a documented case of a transgender person raping anyone in a public restroom, and the only published cases of such were proven to be false. Further, when people say things like this, they are perpetuating violence against transgender people, which has historically (and still does) oppressed and insight further physical violence against them. And honestly, the most common reason there is this stance is because the person typically does not know a trans person and may not even know a person who does know a trans person. But the truth is, they probably do. The probability is more likely that the transgender people around them are just not comfortable enough in the environment to come out and speak up about their gender identity. And yes, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but it is quite sad that some people's opinion does not invite civil discussion but instead incites violence.

This approach is more confrontational, which requires more confidence when using it in a conversation, but it still holds true to all of the previous rules and sentiments. It adds truth based on history, which is an important aspect of trans rights as it reminds people of where we were/ where we are currently with human rights. These ideas can be transferred to most all trans issues and will honor the transgender movement and your allyship. The last thing to keep in mind is the person or reason you are standing up for/with trans rights. The passion -the compassion will shine through in conversation if you keep your reasoning close to heart. Whether it is because of a transgender friend, family member, or just because of your moral values, if you put your emotions into your reasoning, it will create more compelling statements, especially if the statement is well versed with the facts.

Tips to Remember When Discussing Transgender Issues

  1. Transgender issues are not political, they are human rights issues
  2. There is a rich history behind transgender issues
  3. Humanize transgender people through our words and ideas and don't forget to include:
    • 3(b). The facts
    • 3(c).The confidence
    • 3(d). The inspiration behind the support for transgender rights

Charcoal grilled hamburgers are the best.

The weather is warming up, and that means it’s grilling time. It's time to invite friends over and fire up the grill. If you are new to grilling, it's best to start with the basics, and a charcoal grill is a perfect place to start.

Keep reading Show less