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The 2021 QueerX Film Festival brings together original content from LGBTQ creators, inclusive of all identities and perspectives. QueerX is at the nexus of the quickly evolving digital music and film industries.

As a part of the festival Revry, the only LGBTQ-first streaming media network, will present QueerX TV–a free always-on TV channel throughout the month of October that will host all of the festival's “Official Selections" including international LGBTQ documentaries, dramas, comedies and music videos. The channel launched on September 7th and audiences have the opportunity to screen all the selections and vote, in real time, on their category favorites. The audience will vote via QR codes that appear on the screen of the QueerX TV channel.

“The festival gives a platform to queer voices across the amazingly talented spectrum that is the LGBTQ community," shares Revry CEO and Co-Founder, Damian Pelliccione. “We want to continue to create a sense of community and belonging tied to our shared experiences. One where artists, industry professionals and enthusiasts alike can connect and uplift each other from a community and industry perspective."

Key Festival Highlights include:

· September 7th- October 31st: QueerX TV Presented by Lexus premiered on Revry and viewers can screen all the festival selections and vote for their favorite selections from the Comedy, Documentary, Drama, Feature and Music Video categories until September 30th.

· October 11th: On National Coming Out Day, the QueerX Live! Virtual Awards show will stream live on Revry with musical performances, special screenings of the winning films, as well as Revry's annual honoring of influential celebrities who have made an impact on the community with the 2021 Revry Visibility Awards.

QueerX is proud to have Lexus as its Grand Sponsor. This year's travel partner is The Florida Keys/Key West. This year's media partners include; The Advocate, Out, Pride Media, Plus, Out Traveler, and Queerty. Key community partner Black Women Lead has also signed on for the festival.

Upcoming announcements include: Virtual music performances as well as Visibility Award Winners. Past awardees, industry participants, and sponsors include Tyler Oakley, Gigi Gorgeous, Dan Reynolds, LoveLoud, Tegan and Sara, Hannah Hart, Ari Fitz, Bebe Zahara Benet, Amber's Closet, Viacom, EOne, IFC, Funny or Die, Brian Graden Media, Seed&Spark, Adaptive Studios and Powderkeg Media.

ABOUT QUEERX FESTIVAL

Originally founded as Out Web Fest in 2016, QueerX broke the mold of other festivals by giving prominence to honest and unfiltered digital short-form storytelling. Beyond screenings, this unique festival also invites cutting edge musicians to showcase their sound through live performances including panels with top industry experts, providing ample opportunity to meet future collaborators and build professional relationships. QueerX aims to create a space where artists, industry professionals and enthusiasts alike can connect while exploring the future of queer entertainment.

About Revry

Revry is the LGBTQ-first streaming media network with free live TV, movies, series, news and exclusive Original programming amounting to over 5,000 titles. Its mission is to inspire exploration of LGBTQ content for the community and allies. Revry is led by a diverse founding team with technology, digital media, and LGBTQ advocacy experience. Revry reaches millions of global viewers on connected TV, Smart TV, OTT and mobile platforms including Samsung, Vizio, Roku, Apple, Comcast Xfinity, Cox Communications, Google, TiVo, and many others.

How to talk about transgender issues

So how do we talk about transgender issues (even if you're not transgender)? There are three main things to remember when discussing transgender issues today, so before getting into the meat and potatoes of it all, let's keep these things in mind:

  1. It is not a political discussion, it is a human rights discussion.
  2. There is a rich history rooted in transgender rights that must be considered when discussing these issues.
  3. Humanization should always be at the forefront of the conversation.

Before going into any conversation, no matter who it's with, try to keep these things in mind before you say something that may be inappropriate, misguided, or just plain wrong. Even those with the best intentions can mess up; remember that it is always ok to admit when you do not know something or when you are wrong. That being said, let's get into it.

sign with a 'friendly for all genders' image showing a person in a wheelchair, and a person with half a dress and pants on.

Transgender bathroom bills

commons.wikimedia.org

So whether you choose to become a transgender activist or if you just want to be a better ally, this easy talking point will generally keep you in line and on the safe side of conversations while still putting forth the effort to encourage and better represent transgender rights.

Easy, all-around approach: This will work for almost all transgender issues and expand on the previous three rules; firstly, trans issues are not a debate. When discussing with someone, do not indulge in hypotheticals and always remember that transgender people are the exact same as anyone else, with the exact same feelings. Keeping this in mind, let's use the bathroom bill as an example. When discussing this issue, one should humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation. How does one employ this, though? Here is an example of how the conversation may go.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restroom, they will rape my daughters.

So this statement is clearly based on reactionary conversation perpetuated by anti-transgender ideals. This means that the person probably has a misconception of the history and oppression of transgender people. They also show concern for their family, which is a step towards humanization, despite the misconception. Here would be an appropriate response that helps to humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation.

Person 2: I don't want men in the women's restroom, either, which is why we need to make sure people who identify as women are using the women's restroom. There has never been a documented case where a transgender person has raped either a man or woman in a public restroom. And by forcing people to use a restroom that does not match their gender identity, it is promoting violence, as there is a strong history of physical violence against transgender people.

By only saying about three sentences, you are able to do the previous steps while discussing the issue in a civil manner without opening it up to debate. The key to this is to keep it short and sweet, stating both the truth and an ally's stance to support the transgender community. It's critical to make sure that what you say is backed with confidence, though, which is why this second approach is more encouraged as it gives the person speaking more confidence in their opinion.

gif of a man in a suit talking about number 1. Number 1 GIF by PragerU Giphy

The second approach: backed by facts and history, is the exact same as before, but this approach leaves the other person with more questions about their stance and gives them something to consider. Before going into this approach, however, it is important to keep in mind that you are not debating the existence of trans people, nor are you trying to change someone's mind. That is not the goal; the goal is simply to get your opinion across in a way that honors both the trans community and their ideas. Let's take the same example as before but add the new sentiments.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restrooms, they will rape my daughters.

Person 2: There has never been a documented case of a transgender person raping anyone in a public restroom, and the only published cases of such were proven to be false. Further, when people say things like this, they are perpetuating violence against transgender people, which has historically (and still does) oppressed and insight further physical violence against them. And honestly, the most common reason there is this stance is because the person typically does not know a trans person and may not even know a person who does know a trans person. But the truth is, they probably do. The probability is more likely that the transgender people around them are just not comfortable enough in the environment to come out and speak up about their gender identity. And yes, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but it is quite sad that some people's opinion does not invite civil discussion but instead incites violence.

This approach is more confrontational, which requires more confidence when using it in a conversation, but it still holds true to all of the previous rules and sentiments. It adds truth based on history, which is an important aspect of trans rights as it reminds people of where we were/ where we are currently with human rights. These ideas can be transferred to most all trans issues and will honor the transgender movement and your allyship. The last thing to keep in mind is the person or reason you are standing up for/with trans rights. The passion -the compassion will shine through in conversation if you keep your reasoning close to heart. Whether it is because of a transgender friend, family member, or just because of your moral values, if you put your emotions into your reasoning, it will create more compelling statements, especially if the statement is well versed with the facts.

Tips to Remember When Discussing Transgender Issues

  1. Transgender issues are not political, they are human rights issues
  2. There is a rich history behind transgender issues
  3. Humanize transgender people through our words and ideas and don't forget to include:
    • 3(b). The facts
    • 3(c).The confidence
    • 3(d). The inspiration behind the support for transgender rights

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Photo courtesy of Amazon Prime

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