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As the seasons change ushering fall into Bourbon City, visitors can take in the beauty of the changing leaves while enjoying a variety of festivals and events around Louisville’s outdoor parks, venues, and historic neighborhoods. As summer fades to fall, October brings the return of some familiar festivals as well as some unique newcomers. If you are looking for a nice, local weekend getaway, Louisville has something to offer everyone, from its Pride festival to spooky season wonders.

Even better, Louisville Tourism is also currently running a sweepstakes offering a free weekend getaway to Louisville! Enter here for this amazing opportunity!

RELATED COVERAGE:

Louisville Tourism's curated list of October events

Jack O’ Lantern Spectacular | September 30 - October 31

Jack O’ Lantern Spectacular | September 30 - October 31. Photo courtesy of Louisville Tourism.

Returning as a walk-thru event for 2021, visitors can traverse a 1/3-mile path through Iroquois Park featuring over 5,000 professionally carved jack-o-lanterns grouped in themed scenes and set to music. This year’s theme is “Changing the Channel: A Timeline of Television History,” and will feature favorite shows from the 1950’s to what we stream today on our devices and everything in between. Tickets are now on sale.

St. James Court Art Show | October 1-3

Recently capturing two top honors by Sunshine Magazine, the 65th annual art show will be held in historic Old Louisville among the nation’s largest collection of preserved Victorian architecture. Over 600 artists from around the U.S. participate in this three-day juried fine art and contemporary craft show, where guests can discover unique works of art in 17 artistic mediums, from clay to wood, and everything in between. Admission is free and the art show is a rain or shine event.

Boo at the Zoo | Thursday-Sundays October 1–30

Experience the Louisville Zoo magically transformed into a living storybook with costumed characters and trick-or-treating for kids 11 and under. A reduced nightly capacity will help with social distancing and parking is free for party guests.

Highland's Neighborhood. Courtesy of Louisville Tourism.

Louisville Taco & Margarita Festival | October 2

New for 2021, this flavorful fiesta is taking over Lynn Family Stadium complete with margaritas, tequila tacos and live music from 11am-6pm. Tickets start at just $10 (plus fees), and kids under 12 are free.

This event offers the opportunity to savor a variety of food and drinks, as the home of Louisville City FC and Racing Louisville FC transforms for this first-of-its-kind event. Concession stands that normally specialize in burgers and hot dogs will roll out speciality tacos, while the bourbon bars across the concourse focus on a variety of margaritas.

Kentuckiana Pride Festival and Parade | October 8-9

Originally scheduled during national Pride month, this two-day event will be held on the Big Four Lawn at Waterfront Park with performances by Todrick Hall, Neon Trees, DJ Spinderella and more. The festival kicks off with the annual Pride Parade on October 8 at 7:00 pm. This year’s parade will begin in the NuLu neighborhood at Campbell and Market Streets and end at the Big Four Lawn.

Garvin Gate Blues Festival | October 9

Held in Old Louisville on Oak Street at Garvin Place, this 26-year-tradition features music, arts and an array of food and drink vendors. The free street festival kicks off at 2pm.

This event is the largest free neighborhood street music festival in Louisville, and one of the largest and most recognized free blues music festivals in the U.S. Countless legendary blues musicians have performed at the Garvin Gate Blues Festival throughout the years, they help to keep Louisville's blues heritage alive.

Tailspin Ale Fest | October 30

Usually held in late winter, “Louisville’s winter warmer” is becoming ‘Louisville’s scary good beer fest’ in 2021 with over 250 craft beers on tap at Bowman Field, the city’s treasured 101-year-old public airfield. Guests are encouraged to dress up in costume to celebrate the Halloween season. Tailspin comes on the tail end of Louisville Craft Beer Week which celebrates the city’s local love of the sud, October 19-29.


When planning a trip to Louisville, guests can download a copy of the Louisville Tourism’s annual Visitor Guide to help plan a tour around Louisville to see the city's top attractions and bourbon distilleries. Visitors also can get additional city attraction, lodging and dining assistance at gotolouisville.com along with information on the state’s current covid-mitigation guidelines.

How to talk about transgender issues

So how do we talk about transgender issues (even if you're not transgender)? There are three main things to remember when discussing transgender issues today, so before getting into the meat and potatoes of it all, let's keep these things in mind:

  1. It is not a political discussion, it is a human rights discussion.
  2. There is a rich history rooted in transgender rights that must be considered when discussing these issues.
  3. Humanization should always be at the forefront of the conversation.

Before going into any conversation, no matter who it's with, try to keep these things in mind before you say something that may be inappropriate, misguided, or just plain wrong. Even those with the best intentions can mess up; remember that it is always ok to admit when you do not know something or when you are wrong. That being said, let's get into it.

sign with a 'friendly for all genders' image showing a person in a wheelchair, and a person with half a dress and pants on.

Transgender bathroom bills

commons.wikimedia.org

So whether you choose to become a transgender activist or if you just want to be a better ally, this easy talking point will generally keep you in line and on the safe side of conversations while still putting forth the effort to encourage and better represent transgender rights.

Easy, all-around approach: This will work for almost all transgender issues and expand on the previous three rules; firstly, trans issues are not a debate. When discussing with someone, do not indulge in hypotheticals and always remember that transgender people are the exact same as anyone else, with the exact same feelings. Keeping this in mind, let's use the bathroom bill as an example. When discussing this issue, one should humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation. How does one employ this, though? Here is an example of how the conversation may go.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restroom, they will rape my daughters.

So this statement is clearly based on reactionary conversation perpetuated by anti-transgender ideals. This means that the person probably has a misconception of the history and oppression of transgender people. They also show concern for their family, which is a step towards humanization, despite the misconception. Here would be an appropriate response that helps to humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation.

Person 2: I don't want men in the women's restroom, either, which is why we need to make sure people who identify as women are using the women's restroom. There has never been a documented case where a transgender person has raped either a man or woman in a public restroom. And by forcing people to use a restroom that does not match their gender identity, it is promoting violence, as there is a strong history of physical violence against transgender people.

By only saying about three sentences, you are able to do the previous steps while discussing the issue in a civil manner without opening it up to debate. The key to this is to keep it short and sweet, stating both the truth and an ally's stance to support the transgender community. It's critical to make sure that what you say is backed with confidence, though, which is why this second approach is more encouraged as it gives the person speaking more confidence in their opinion.

gif of a man in a suit talking about number 1. Number 1 GIF by PragerU Giphy

The second approach: backed by facts and history, is the exact same as before, but this approach leaves the other person with more questions about their stance and gives them something to consider. Before going into this approach, however, it is important to keep in mind that you are not debating the existence of trans people, nor are you trying to change someone's mind. That is not the goal; the goal is simply to get your opinion across in a way that honors both the trans community and their ideas. Let's take the same example as before but add the new sentiments.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restrooms, they will rape my daughters.

Person 2: There has never been a documented case of a transgender person raping anyone in a public restroom, and the only published cases of such were proven to be false. Further, when people say things like this, they are perpetuating violence against transgender people, which has historically (and still does) oppressed and insight further physical violence against them. And honestly, the most common reason there is this stance is because the person typically does not know a trans person and may not even know a person who does know a trans person. But the truth is, they probably do. The probability is more likely that the transgender people around them are just not comfortable enough in the environment to come out and speak up about their gender identity. And yes, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but it is quite sad that some people's opinion does not invite civil discussion but instead incites violence.

This approach is more confrontational, which requires more confidence when using it in a conversation, but it still holds true to all of the previous rules and sentiments. It adds truth based on history, which is an important aspect of trans rights as it reminds people of where we were/ where we are currently with human rights. These ideas can be transferred to most all trans issues and will honor the transgender movement and your allyship. The last thing to keep in mind is the person or reason you are standing up for/with trans rights. The passion -the compassion will shine through in conversation if you keep your reasoning close to heart. Whether it is because of a transgender friend, family member, or just because of your moral values, if you put your emotions into your reasoning, it will create more compelling statements, especially if the statement is well versed with the facts.

Tips to Remember When Discussing Transgender Issues

  1. Transgender issues are not political, they are human rights issues
  2. There is a rich history behind transgender issues
  3. Humanize transgender people through our words and ideas and don't forget to include:
    • 3(b). The facts
    • 3(c).The confidence
    • 3(d). The inspiration behind the support for transgender rights

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Photo courtesy of Amazon Prime

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