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Christopher Polk

Michaela Jae Rodriguez at The Queerties


The Queerties 10th anniversary award show will begin streaming on Revry and YouTube tonight, Wednesday, March 16, 2022, the first time in its history that the fully-produced live show ceremony will be viewable on national TV. The Queerties is a celebration of entertainment and pop culture moments that defined the past year in the LGBTQ community.

Uplifting LGBTQ voices and organizations

Produced by the LGBTQ entertainment news site, Queerty, the ceremony is designed to uplift and spotlight LGBTQ creators, tastemakers, and storytellers who are not often recognized at other award shows. “We’re like the People’s Choice awards, but super gay, and with way more drag queens,” says Dan Tracer, Queerty’s Editor in Chief who co-hosts The Queerties 10th anniversary award show with RuPaul’s Drag Race UK vs The World’s Mo Heart.

This year’s event honors Pose’s Michaela Jaé Rodriguez with the Icon Award and RuPaul’s Drag Race season 13 winner Gottmik with the Groundbreaker Award. Celebrities appearing at The Queerties 10th anniversary award show include Murray Bartlett (White Lotus), Robin De Jesus (Tick Tick Boom), Amy Schneider (Jeopardy!), Ryan O’Connell (Special, Queer as Folk), Aubrey Peeples (Nashville), and a bevy of RuPaul’s Drag Race favorites including Bianca Del Rio.

Manila Luzon and Michaela Jae Rodriguez near the stage at The Queerties

Manila Luzon and Michaela Jae Rodriguez

Nareth Chuon

The Queerties 10th anniversary award show

Nominees for The Queerties 10th anniversary award show were selected by the editorial team at Queerty. Winners were then voted on by Queerty readers. Queerty received over 1.4 million votes for categories ranging from the “Badass” award, honoring the top LGBTQ newsmakers, to “Closet Door Bustdown”, recognizing brave notables who shook up mainstream America with their coming out stories. “When folks are out and proud, and making waves in the world, we think it’s important to honor that,” continues Tracer.

The Queerties 10th anniversary award show is packed with comedy, fashion and over-the-top fierce lewks, but there is a serious side to the ceremony, too. “A large reason for this event is to shine a light on independent LGBTQ artists,” says Scott Gatz of Q.Digital, the parent company of Queerty. “Whether they are creating indie music videos, web series, YouTube content, TikToks, or posting on Instagram, the Queerties strives to honor creatives who are making content, with or without the support of a brand or a studio.”

Guests dressed up at The Queerties

Queerties Guests

Nareth Chuon

Queerty decided to televise this year’s ceremony after the success of last year’s virtual event. “While we were thrilled to be able to return to an in-person celebration for The Queerties 10th anniversary award show, with a fully vaccinated and tested crowd, we wanted to viewers at home to join the party as well,” Gatz explains.

America's First LGBTQ Streaming Network

Revry, America’s first LGBTQ streaming network, made for an ideal partner. The show will also stream on Queerty.com and Queerty’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

“We have so much to celebrate this year,” says Dan Tracer. “The LGBTQ community made significant strides in pop culture that will have a lasting impact on the next generation of queer youth.” He points to Queerties Icon Award Michaela Jaé Rodriguez, a trans woman of color who made history this year as the first trans actor to win a Golden Globe, and the first trans woman to earn an Emmy nomination in a lead acting category; both for her work on Pose.

In her Queerties acceptance speech, Rodriguez reflects on her career accomplishments and the legacy she hopes to leave. “All I wanted to do was inspire the youth. To encourage them to dare to be who (they) are and never be afraid of what anyone says. Instead, challenge them to be more open and understanding of the people that we are, which is fabulous.”

The Queerties 10th Anniversary award show will begin streaming on Revry, Queerty.com, and Queerty’s YouTube and Facebook channels at 9 pm ET/6 pm PT. There is an impressive list of Queerties' 10th-anniversary winners for 2022.

Editor's Note: This is a Press Release

How to talk about transgender issues

So how do we talk about transgender issues (even if you're not transgender)? There are three main things to remember when discussing transgender issues today, so before getting into the meat and potatoes of it all, let's keep these things in mind:

  1. It is not a political discussion, it is a human rights discussion.
  2. There is a rich history rooted in transgender rights that must be considered when discussing these issues.
  3. Humanization should always be at the forefront of the conversation.

Before going into any conversation, no matter who it's with, try to keep these things in mind before you say something that may be inappropriate, misguided, or just plain wrong. Even those with the best intentions can mess up; remember that it is always ok to admit when you do not know something or when you are wrong. That being said, let's get into it.

sign with a 'friendly for all genders' image showing a person in a wheelchair, and a person with half a dress and pants on.

Transgender bathroom bills

commons.wikimedia.org

So whether you choose to become a transgender activist or if you just want to be a better ally, this easy talking point will generally keep you in line and on the safe side of conversations while still putting forth the effort to encourage and better represent transgender rights.

Easy, all-around approach: This will work for almost all transgender issues and expand on the previous three rules; firstly, trans issues are not a debate. When discussing with someone, do not indulge in hypotheticals and always remember that transgender people are the exact same as anyone else, with the exact same feelings. Keeping this in mind, let's use the bathroom bill as an example. When discussing this issue, one should humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation. How does one employ this, though? Here is an example of how the conversation may go.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restroom, they will rape my daughters.

So this statement is clearly based on reactionary conversation perpetuated by anti-transgender ideals. This means that the person probably has a misconception of the history and oppression of transgender people. They also show concern for their family, which is a step towards humanization, despite the misconception. Here would be an appropriate response that helps to humanize, de-politicize, and normalize the conversation.

Person 2: I don't want men in the women's restroom, either, which is why we need to make sure people who identify as women are using the women's restroom. There has never been a documented case where a transgender person has raped either a man or woman in a public restroom. And by forcing people to use a restroom that does not match their gender identity, it is promoting violence, as there is a strong history of physical violence against transgender people.

By only saying about three sentences, you are able to do the previous steps while discussing the issue in a civil manner without opening it up to debate. The key to this is to keep it short and sweet, stating both the truth and an ally's stance to support the transgender community. It's critical to make sure that what you say is backed with confidence, though, which is why this second approach is more encouraged as it gives the person speaking more confidence in their opinion.

gif of a man in a suit talking about number 1. Number 1 GIF by PragerU Giphy

The second approach: backed by facts and history, is the exact same as before, but this approach leaves the other person with more questions about their stance and gives them something to consider. Before going into this approach, however, it is important to keep in mind that you are not debating the existence of trans people, nor are you trying to change someone's mind. That is not the goal; the goal is simply to get your opinion across in a way that honors both the trans community and their ideas. Let's take the same example as before but add the new sentiments.

Person 1: I don't want men in the women's restrooms, they will rape my daughters.

Person 2: There has never been a documented case of a transgender person raping anyone in a public restroom, and the only published cases of such were proven to be false. Further, when people say things like this, they are perpetuating violence against transgender people, which has historically (and still does) oppressed and insight further physical violence against them. And honestly, the most common reason there is this stance is because the person typically does not know a trans person and may not even know a person who does know a trans person. But the truth is, they probably do. The probability is more likely that the transgender people around them are just not comfortable enough in the environment to come out and speak up about their gender identity. And yes, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but it is quite sad that some people's opinion does not invite civil discussion but instead incites violence.

This approach is more confrontational, which requires more confidence when using it in a conversation, but it still holds true to all of the previous rules and sentiments. It adds truth based on history, which is an important aspect of trans rights as it reminds people of where we were/ where we are currently with human rights. These ideas can be transferred to most all trans issues and will honor the transgender movement and your allyship. The last thing to keep in mind is the person or reason you are standing up for/with trans rights. The passion -the compassion will shine through in conversation if you keep your reasoning close to heart. Whether it is because of a transgender friend, family member, or just because of your moral values, if you put your emotions into your reasoning, it will create more compelling statements, especially if the statement is well versed with the facts.

Tips to Remember When Discussing Transgender Issues

  1. Transgender issues are not political, they are human rights issues
  2. There is a rich history behind transgender issues
  3. Humanize transgender people through our words and ideas and don't forget to include:
    • 3(b). The facts
    • 3(c).The confidence
    • 3(d). The inspiration behind the support for transgender rights

Transgender Sign in Pride Parade



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